TinTin++ Mud Client Manual
Path
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Syntax: #path {create|delete|describe|end|ins|load|map|save|run|walk} {argument}
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The path command is a quick and easy way to record your movements and create a list of commands to move from one location to another, and back. For a far more advanced mapper check out the #map command.
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#path {create}
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This command starts the path mapping mode. If you enter a movement command (listed with #pathdir) it will be added to your path.
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#path {delete}
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Delete the last command from the path.
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Example: #action {Alas, you cannot go that way.} {#path delete}
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#path {describe}
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Describe the path and current position. Useful for people with a screen reader.
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#path {destroy}
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Clear the path and stop path mapping.
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#path {goto} {index}
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Move your position on the path to the given index.
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#path {insert} {forward} {backward}
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Insert a command to the end of the path.
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Example: #path ins {open north} {};n;#path ins {} {open south}
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#path {load} {variable}
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Load the given variable as the new path.
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#path {map}
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This command displays the path created so far, it shows a list of commands and not a graphical map. Your current position on the path is shown between brackets.
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#path {move} {forward|backward}
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Move the position on the path forward or backward. If a number is given the position is changed by the given number of steps.
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#path {run} {delay}
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For this command to work you must have created or loaded a path. Upon execution all commands in your path are removed and executed at once, unless you provide the optional delay argument to delay execution between each command with the given floating point number of seconds.
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Example: #path run 0.5
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#path {save} {forward|backward} {variable}
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This command saves the created path to the provided variable, you must specify whether to save the path forward, or backward. You can use f and b for short. If you use: #path save f AtoB you can execute the saved path using: $AtoB.
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Example: #path new;n;n;n;e;e;e;#path save backward return;$return
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#path {swap}
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Swap the forward and backward path.
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Example: #path new;n;n;n;e;e;e;#path swap;#path run
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#path {unzip}
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Load the given speedwalk as the new path.
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#path {walk} {forward|backward}
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For this command to work you must have created or loaded a path. Upon execution the next command in your path queue is removed and executed. If the end of your path is reached this triggers the END OF PATH event.
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Example: #tick {slowwalk} {#walk f} {0.5};#event {END OF PATH} {#untick slowwalk}
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#path {zip}
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Turn the path into a speedwalk.
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See also: Map and Pathdir.
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